Reform Functional Skills- English Level 2

Reform Functional Skills- English Level 2

What You Will Learn  

Introduction to Functional Skills              

L2.1 SLC Identify relevant information from extended explanations or presentations

L2.3 SLC Respond effectively to detailed or extended questions and feedback

L2.5 SLC Communicate information, ideas and opinions clearly and effectively, providing further detail and development if required

L2.9 SLC Adapt contributions to discussions to suit audience, purpose and medium By the end of the

session, learners should be able to:

•             introduce themselves to the group

•             tell the group about something they are interested in

•             read about and discuss the course

•             listen to and follow instructions. 

Learners should be able to take part in a ‘getting to know you’ activity. They could be asked to speak for a minute or two, introducing themselves to the group and describing something they are interested in, or do as a hobby. As part of the induction session, learners could complete a group learning contract and/or share their hopes and fears about the course.

Learners should understand that there are three components to Functional Skills Level 2: Reading, Writing (including Spelling, punctuation and grammar) and Speaking, listening and communicating. They could be given a leaflet/handout with this information and asked to identify the key points, or listen to a presentation outlining the key areas. This could include, for example, the types of written texts they will learn to produce and the areas they will be assessed on as part of the reading exam, e.g. inferred meaning. It could be useful for learners to develop a glossary of new terms that they will use across the year, such as bias, organisational features, tone, etc.

 

As part of their induction, learners could show that they understand the health and safety practices of the centre. For example, where the fire exit is. Verbal questions can be asked to check understanding and to assess each learner’s speaking, listening and communicating starting point. 

Spelling, punctuation and grammar: Using punctuation  L2.20 SPG Punctuate writing correctly using a wide range of punctuation markers (e.g. colons, commas, inverted commas, apostrophes and quotation marks)

By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify how to use a range of punctuation marks

•             explain the effect of each punctuation mark

•             use each mark correctly in a sentence

•             proofread and correct punctuation errors.           Learners should be introduced to the punctuation marks they will need to be able to use in their own writing. They should be able to use a wide range of punctuation accurately, including colons, commas, inverted commas, apostrophes and quotation marks. Learners should make sure they can use the punctuation assessed at Level 1 and below correctly, including full stops, capital letters, exclamation and question marks.  

 

Learners could be asked to work in pairs to create definitions for each mark, or could be given a matching exercise to match the mark to the correct definition.

 

Using their list of definitions, learners should be able to identify where punctuation is needed in example sentences. This could be delivered as a quiz or as a worksheet activity. This could be used as an opportunity to discuss possible areas of confusion. For example, the difference between inverted commas and quotation marks.

 

Learners could be given a short text to proofread and correct. This could be a timed task to encourage learners to leave sufficient time to proofread and correct their own written work. For example, learners could initially be given a short time, e.g. two minutes, to find the errors, and then subsequently given longer, to highlight how long it takes to read a text carefully and to correct it accurately. 

Reading: Reading for information  

L2.18 R Follow an argument, identifying different points of view and distinguishing fact from opinion

L2.11 R Identify the different situations when the main points are sufficient and when it is important to have specific details

L2.5 SLC Communicate information, ideas and opinions clearly and effectively, providing further detail and development if required

L2.6 SLC Express opinions and arguments and support them with relevant and persuasive evidence

 

                By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             distinguish facts from opinions

•             read the texts closely

•             identify the style of writing/tone

•             explain the key ideas in the text.

This session could begin with a starter activity that introduces the learner to the difference between a fact and opinion. A fact is something the writer presents as true or is presented as a truth in the context of the text. For example, a text may state: ‘It takes two hours to travel from London to Manchester’. While this may not be ‘true’, it is presented as a fact in the context of the text. The learners could work individually or in teams to decide if a statement is a fact or an opinion. This could be facilitated as a quiz.

Learners should be able to read both straightforward and complex texts on a range of topics. Learners should practise both skim reading and close reading a text.

Learners should become familiar with texts that instruct, describe, explain and persuade. It may be useful to introduce them to the range of texts they will be asked to produce as part of the writing exam by asking them to read these text types. For example, articles, emails, diary entries, reports, letters, information/advice sheets, reviews, forum contributions. They should be able to identify the writer’s style, voice or tone. For example, a writer may use a humorous tone when writing about an experience that they enjoyed. 

Learners should be able to use their close reading skills to answer a series of comprehension questions that demonstrate their understanding of the main points and ideas covered by the writer. It may be useful to introduce this skill by encouraging learners to read texts of personal interest.

Learners could be encouraged to discuss the ideas in the texts to support the development of speaking, listening and communicating.

Reading:

Reading to understand purpose of texts   

 L2.11 R Identify the different situations when the main points are sufficient and when it is important to have specific details

L2.6 SLC Express opinions and arguments and support them with relevant and persuasive evidence

L2.5 SLC Communicate information, ideas and opinions clearly and effectively, providing further detail and development if required  

 By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             read and highlight the key words in the texts

•             identify the main purpose of the texts

•             discuss the key ideas in the texts

•             explain the key ideas in the texts

•             use punctuation to understand meaning in the texts.     Building on the previous session, learners should be able to read and highlight the key ideas in both straightforward and complex texts on a similar topic. For example, three texts on gaming. A straightforward text might be a forum discussion about people’s favourite games. A complex text may consider the disadvantages of playing games regularly.    

After reading the texts, the group could take part in a group discussion, sharing their thoughts on the key ideas and comparing their understanding.

Learners should be able to answer a series of comprehension questions showing their understanding. The questions should challenge the learner to answer in detail, drawing evidence from several parts of the texts.

Reading: Comparing texts  

L2.12 R Compare information, ideas and opinions in different texts, including how they are conveyed

L2.18 R Follow an argument, identifying different points of view and distinguishing fact from opinion

L2.5 SLC Communicate information, ideas and opinions clearly and effectively, providing further detail and development if required

L2.6 SLC Express opinions and arguments and support them with relevant and persuasive evidence        By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify facts and opinions

•             explain the key ideas in the texts

•             compare information in the texts

•             use quotations o evidence their ideas.   Learners should be able to make comparisons between the key information in the texts. They could begin by noting any similarities the texts have. For example, texts about sport and fitness may have similar ideas about how to encourage the public to stay healthy. 

Learners should be introduced to using quotations to evidence their ideas. For example, if they state that both texts recommend finding an activity that fits in with your lifestyle, learners should be able to find a quote from each text which evidences this. 

Learners should be able to find at least two similarities in the texts that they read, and draft paragraphs that make clear links between the texts, supported by quotations

Learners should be able to distinguish the use of facts from opinions in each text to support them to identify the writer’s bias and voice.

Learners could be encouraged to discuss the ideas in the texts to support the development of speaking, listening and communicating.

Reading: Textual features

L2.14 R Understand the relationship between textual features and devices, and how they can be used to shape meaning for different audiences and purposes

L2.17 R Analyse texts, of different levels of complexity, recognising their use of vocabulary and identifying levels of formality and bias

L2.5 SLC Communicate information, ideas and opinions clearly and effectively, providing further detail and development if required

L2.6 SLC Express opinions and arguments and support them with relevant and persuasive evidence        By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify and explain textual features

•             say what effect each feature has

•             explain why the feature has been used

•             identify formal and informal language.

 Learners should be introduced to a range of new language features and be able to say what effect they have on the reader. These could include metaphors, similes, cliché, alliteration, etc. Learners should be able to recognise the different sentence types, e.g. statements (declarative), commands (imperative), questions (interrogative) and exclamations (exclamatory). They should be familiar with the parts of speech that affect meaning, for example adjectives. Learners should also be familiar with the features that appear at Level 1, including direct address, first person, rule of three, repetition, statistics, quotations and adjectives.

Learners could be introduced to the features through a sorting activity and asked to match the feature to the definition. They could extend this activity by creating their own examples of each feature.

Learners should be encouraged to note these features as they read a text and then consider what effect they have. For example, a question may be used to inform the reader about something. It is not enough just to identify a feature. Learners must be able to identify features that are used for a specific purpose. They should consider if the feature helps the writer to persuade or encourage, inform, instruct or advise, describe or explain.

Learners should be able to spot the difference between formal and informal language. They should be able to say when formal and informal language suit the purpose and the audience. 

Reading: Organisational features  

L2.16 R Understand organisational features and use them to locate relevant information in a range of straightforward and complex sources

L2.11 R Identify the different situations when the main points are sufficient and when it is important to have specific details

L2.5 SLC Communicate information, ideas and opinions clearly and effectively, providing further detail and development if required

L2.6 SLC Express opinions and arguments and support them with relevant and persuasive evidence  

 By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify organisational features

•             use organisational features to locate relevant information in a text

•             identify and explain the key ideas in the text.  

 Learners should be familiar with the key organisational features used by writers to present information. These include footnotes, tables and captions. Learners should also be familiar with some of the features used at Level 1, including text boxes, bullet points, speech bubbles, numbering, menus, etc.

Learners should practise reading texts that use features such as footnotes. They should be encouraged to consider how each feature supports the reader to locate information. Learners could be asked to identify the features as they begin to read a text.

Learners should be able to identify and understand the key ideas in the text. They could be given a series of comprehension questions to support them to develop extended answers about the texts.

Learners could be encouraged to discuss the ideas in the texts to support the development of speaking, listening and communicating.

Reading: Finding meaning 

L2.15 R Use a range of reference materials and appropriate resources (e.g. glossaries, legends/keys) for different purposes, including to find the meanings of words in straightforward and complex sources

L1.12 R Recognise that language and other textual features can be varied to suit different audiences and purposes

L2.16 R Understand organisational features and use them to locate relevant information in a range of straightforward and complex sources

L2.11 R Identify the different situations when the main points are sufficient and when it is important to have specific details

L2.5 SLC Communicate information, ideas and opinions clearly and effectively, providing further detail and development if required

L2.6 SLC Express opinions and arguments and support them with relevant and persuasive evidence 

By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             use a dictionary to locate a meaning

•             suggest an alternative word

•             identify the textual features used in a text

•             use organisational features to locate relevant information in a text

•             identify and explain the key ideas in a text.

 

 Learners should be able to use a dictionary and other reference materials to find the meaning of a word. They could be encouraged to do this with any new vocabulary presented in a text.

Learners should be able to use a dictionary definition to suggest an alternative word that has the same meaning. Learners could be given a series of sentences and asked to use a dictionary to both find the meaning of a word and suggest a suitable alternative.

Learners should draw on their knowledge from previous lessons and be able to identify the key ideas in a text. They should be encouraged to use the organisational features to locate information and to discuss the language used by the writer to convey meaning. 

Learners could be encouraged to discuss the ideas in the texts to support the development of speaking, listening and communicating.

Reading: Mock paper practice (1) 

All Level 2 Reading specification references

L2.4 SLC Make requests and ask detailed and pertinent questions to obtain specific information in a range of contexts   By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify key words in the question

•             read and understand the texts

•             use a dictionary to find meaning.

 

  Learners should be given the opportunity to complete a mock practice paper in exam conditions (including having access to any approved exam arrangements, such as extra time).

Learners could be introduced to the format of the exam by discussing the questions as a group. Ask them to highlight the key words in each question to aid understanding. 

Learners should read the texts independently and complete as many questions as they can. They should be encouraged to use all of the time available and should check their work carefully. Each learner should have access to a dictionary. 

Reading: Comparison 

L2.12 R Compare information, ideas and opinions in different texts, including how they are conveyed

L2.18 R Follow an argument, identifying different points of view and distinguishing fact from opinion

L2.19 R Identify different styles of writing and writer’s voice

L2.6 SLC Express opinions and arguments and support them with relevant and persuasive evidence 

By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify revision targets

•             identify and discuss the key ideas in the texts

•             compare texts and select appropriate quotations

•             recognise textual and organisational features.

 Part of this session could be used as a ‘walk and talk’ to run through the mock practice paper as a group. Or learners could be set a task and be allocated some one-to-one time to discuss their mock result. They could be given some time to identify a revision target to improve their result. 

Learners should be given straightforward and complex texts to read. These could be read as a group. Learners should be able to identify the writer’s voice and the style of writing. This could include reflecting on the level of formality and the writer’s tone. This could be assessed as part of a group discussion or through a series of comprehension questions.

Learners should be able to make comparisons between the texts by finding at least two similarities, and support their ideas with suitable quotations. 

Learners could be encouraged to discuss the ideas in the texts to support the development of speaking, listening and communicating.

 

Reading: Implicit and inferred meaning

 L2.13 R Identify implicit and inferred meaning in texts

L2.17 R Analyse texts, of different levels of complexity, recognising their use of vocabulary and identifying levels of formality and bias

L2.18 R Follow an argument, identifying different points of view and distinguishing fact from opinion      By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify implicit and inferred meaning

•             use context to understand meaning

•             identify and explain the key ideas in texts

•             discuss the key ideas in texts.    Learners should be able to infer meaning that is not explicit by using the context of the text. For example, an article on the latest fashions may use the phrase ‘a fashion revolution’. Learners should be able to explain 

what this phrase is saying about the topic.

As learners read texts, they should be able to identify, explain and discuss the key ideas. This could be assessed in a group discussion. For example, asking the learners to read two different articles on a current event, each with opposing views, could encourage debate and reinforce the difference between fact and opinion. Or learners could be asked to answer a series of comprehension-style questions. 

Reading: Mock paper practice (2)

All Level 2 Reading specification references

L2.4 SLC Make requests and ask detailed and pertinent questions to obtain specific information in a range of contexts  

By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify key words in the question

•             read and understand the texts

•             use a dictionary to find meaning.

 Learners could be given a second opportunity to complete a mock practice paper in exam conditions (including having access to any approved exam arrangements, such as extra time).

It may be useful to recap any areas of difficulty identified in the first mock paper results. A question and answer session could take place to ensure the learners understand the demands of the exam and to give them the opportunity to discuss any features of the exam they are unsure of. 

Learners should read the texts independently and complete as many questions as they can. They should be encouraged to use all of the time available and should check their work carefully. Each learner should have access to a dictionary. This may be an opportunity to enter the learners for the Reading exam.*

 

*Assessment of this qualification can take place at the centre’s discretion. Any opportunities to formally assess learners that are given in this Scheme of Work are only suggestions.

 

Speaking, listening and communicating: Listening closely  

L2.1 SLC Identify relevant information from extended explanations or presentations

L2.2 SLC Follow narratives and lines of argument 

L2.6 SLC Express opinions and arguments and support them with relevant and persuasive evidence 

 

By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify the key features of a successful discussion

•             demonstrate close listening

•             identify the keys ideas shared in the discussion.

Learners could be introduced to this activity by asking them to reflect on a time when they have had to take part in a group discussion. They could work in small groups to identify some good discussion techniques. For example, not speaking over others, demonstrating positive body language. 

It may be useful to set some ground rules before taking part in any speaking and listening activities. 

Learners could be divided into small groups of between three and five, and asked to discuss a given topic. They should be able to show that they have listened to the views of others by recalling what was said in the discussion and responding to the argument presented. 

Learners could be encouraged to reflect on whether their discussion was successful and identify areas that they could improve. 

 

Speaking, listening and communicating: Questions (Task 1: part 1)  

L2.4 SLC Make requests and ask detailed and pertinent questions to obtain specific information in a range of contexts

L2.3 SLC Respond effectively to detailed or extended questions and feedback 

By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             prepare their ideas

•             ask detailed questions

•             listen carefully and respond to a question in detail.

Learners should be given the opportunity to practise Task 1 of the formal assessments. 

Learners could begin by identifying the key elements of a successful presentation. They could be shown a short presentation and asked to say what went well and what could be done differently. 

Learners could use this session to prepare their practice presentation. They should complete some research on their topic. Their presentations should be issue-based, e.g. on a current affair or recent news development.

Learners should be introduced to the difference between open and closed questions. They should be encouraged to ask questions that require a detailed response.  

Learners could be encouraged to develop cue cards to help prompt them. However, they must understand that they cannot read from their notes. Learners could use presentation software for this task. 

Speaking, listening and communicating:

Presentations (Task 1: part 2)   

L2.1 SLC Identify relevant information from extended explanations or presentations

L2.2 SLC Follow narratives and lines of argument 

L2.3 SLC Respond effectively to detailed or extended questions and feedback

L2.4 SLC Make requests and ask detailed and pertinent questions to obtain specific information in a range of contexts

L2.5 SLC Express opinions and arguments and support them with relevant and persuasive evidence

L2.7 SLC Use language that is effective, accurate and appropriate to context and situation  

By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             Give their presentation to the group

•             speak clearly about their topic

•             ask pertinent questions

•             listen and respond to questions in detail. 

Learners could use their preparation from the last session to practise Task 1 in small groups. 

They should aim to present for 4–5 minutes to a group of 3–4 of their peers. They should listen closely to the questions at the end and respond clearly and in detail. Each group member should also be prepared to ask more than one question to the other members in their group. The questions asked should support and encourage a detailed response. 

 

Learners should be given some feedback on their practice presentation. They should be encouraged to reflect on their contribution and to identify a goal to work towards. 

Speaking, listening and communicating:

Discussions

(Task 2)   

L2.6 SLC Express opinions and arguments and support them with relevant and persuasive evidence

L2.7 SLC Use language that is effective, accurate and appropriate to context and situation

L2.8 SLC Make relevant and constructive contributions to move discussion forward

L2.9 SLC Adapt contributions to discussions to suit audience, purpose and medium

L2.10 SLC Interject and redirect discussion using appropriate language and register   

By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             research their topic

•             contribute to a formal group discussion

•             share their opinions with the group

•             listen closely

•             wait for a gap before speaking

•             use an appropriate tone

•             move the discussion forward

 Learners should be given the opportunity to practise a formal discussion. They will need time to complete research on their given topic. The topic should be sufficiently challenging to allow learners to express opinions and speak persuasively. For example, on why people should or should not vote.

 

Learners should work in groups of 3–5 and discuss their topic for 15 minutes. 

This could be done as a peer observation activity, where others in the group give informal feedback to the learners completing the practice discussion.

Learners should be given feedback from the assessor. They should have the opportunity to reflect on their practice discussion and set targets for improvement. 

Speaking, listening and communicating:

Task 1 and 2 (formal assessment)  

 All Level 2 Speaking, listening and communicating specification references  

 By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             give a short presentation

•             ask pertinent questions

•             listen to and answer questions in detail

•             contribute to a group discussion

•             listen to the ideas of others

•             use an appropriate tone. 

Learners should be formally assessed against the Speaking, listening and communicating specification references. They should be assessed giving a short presentation to a small group of peers, who should ask pertinent questions. Each learner should both ask and answer questions.

 

Learners should also be assessed taking part in a group discussion with their peers. 

Writing: Format and structure/

Information sheet  

 L2.25 W Organise writing for different purposes using appropriate format and structure (e.g. standard templates, paragraphs, bullet points, tables)

L2.23 W Communicate information, ideas and opinions clearly, coherently and effectively

L2.24 W Write text of an appropriate level of detail and of appropriate length (including where this is specified) to meet the needs of purpose and audience   

By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify the correct format and structure of each text type

•             identify the purpose of a text

•             identify and use appropriate language features.

 

 To introduce this topic, learners could reflect on the variety of texts that they have read previously and be asked to identify the appropriate format and structure for each text type. Text types could include articles, emails, diary entries, reports, letters, information/advice sheets, reviews and forum contributions. 

Learners should understand that their writing should be functional. For example, a letter without a return address may not be functional as the recipient may be unable to respond. 

Learners should be able to plan and draft an information sheet or leaflet. For example, learners could be asked to create an information sheet giving advice. They should be able to identify the purpose of their writing and use this to select the correct tone when writing. For example, an advice sheet may use modal verbs such as ‘could’, ‘would’, ‘should’ to make suggestions.

Learners should be able to reflect on their previous study of textual features to identify the features that may be appropriate to use in their writing. For example, an information sheet is likely to use the direct address ‘you’.

 

Learners should take time to check that their meaning is clear. 

Spelling, punctuation and grammar: 

Spelling strategies  L2.22 SPG Spell words used in work, study and daily life, including a range of specialist words

                By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify common spelling errors

•             identify a spelling strategy to support learning 

•             identify and correct spelling errors

•             identify and use punctuation correctly.

 

 Learners should be aware of the emphasis placed on Spelling, punctuation and grammar in the formal writing exam.

Learners could be asked to identify common words that they find difficult to spell correctly, for example homophones. 

Learners should identify a spelling strategy that helps them to remember challenging words. For example: looking, covering, writing or sounding out the words.

Learners should be encouraged to proofread their work, checking closely for spelling errors, particularly where an error may affect meaning. 

Learners should be able to recall the punctuation marks they were asked to identify at the start of the course. These include colons, commas, inverted commas, apostrophes and quotation marks. Learners should be able to proofread and correct sentences where these marks have been used incorrectly. Learners should be encouraged to check their own work for the use of these marks each time they proofread their written responses. 

 

Spelling, punctuation and grammar: Grammar

(SLC retakes)     L2.21 SPG Use correct grammar (e.g. subject–verb agreement, consistent use of a range of tenses, definite and indefinite articles) and modality devices (e.g. to express probability or desirability)

 

L2.28 W Construct complex sentences consistently and accurately, using paragraphs where appropriate

  By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify simple, compound and complex sentences

•             write simple, compound and complex sentences

•             identify and use the correct definite and indefinite article

•             use the correct subject–verb agreement

•             use the correct tense when writing

•             use modality devices. 

Learners should be able to write clearly to ensure that their meaning is understood. They should be able to use complex sentences to express their ideas. Learners should be able to identify when it is appropriate to write in the singular or in the plural. For example, by using ‘is’ and ‘are’ correctly in their writing. Learners should also be able to use the definite and indefinite article and the correct tense accurately.

Depending on the needs of the group, time may need to be given to introduce and discuss these ideas. Learners could be asked to identify and correct grammatical errors in the writing of others, and/or could take part in a quiz covering these topics.

Learners should be able to use modality devices accurately to express probability or desirability. For example, when writing about an event that ‘could’ take place. 

This session could also be used as an opportunity to assess any Speaking, listening and communicating retakes. 

Writing: Structure and using paragraphs  

  L2.27 W Use different language and register (e.g. persuasive techniques, supporting evidence, specialist words), suited to audience and purpose

L2.28 W Construct complex sentences consistently and accurately, using paragraphs where appropriate

L2.25 W Organise writing for different purposes using appropriate format and structure (e.g. standard templates, paragraphs, bullet points, tables) 

 By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             use a clear structure when writing

•             identify when to use a paragraph

•             use appropriate language and register

•             write in depth and with detail.   Learners should be encouraged to plan their writing and consider the structure needed to develop a coherent response. They should ensure that their writing has a beginning, middle and end. For example, when writing an article, it may be useful to introduce the audience to the topic before establishing an argument. 

 

Learners should be encouraged to write in depth and with detail, but should avoid word-counting. Learners should be able to judge whether their response fully answers the question and meets the needs of the intended audience. They could be given some sample learner responses and asked to consider whether the writer has fully met the purpose of the task and the needs of the audience.

Learners should be able to use paragraphs effectively. They could be asked to insert paragraph breaks into a section of continuous text and say why and where paragraphing is needed. 

Writing:Letters

L2.23 W Communicate information, ideas and opinions clearly, coherently and effectively

L2.24 W Write text of an appropriate level of detail and of appropriate length (including where this is specified) to meet the needs of purpose and audience

L2.25 W Organise writing for different purposes using appropriate format and structure (e.g. standard templates, paragraphs, bullet points, tables)

L2.22 SPG Spell words used in work, study and daily life, including a range of specialist words

L2.21 SPG Use correct grammar (e.g. subject–verb agreement, consistent use of a range of tenses, definite and indefinite articles) and modality devices (e.g. to express probability or desirability)

L2.20 SPG Punctuate writing correctly using a wide range of punctuation markers (e.g. colons, commas, inverted commas, apostrophes and quotation marks)

L2.28 W Construct complex sentences consistently and accurately, using paragraphs where appropriate 

 By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify the correct layout for a formal letter

•             plan and draft a formal letter

•             use complex sentences

•             proofread their work for spelling, punctuation and grammar errors.

Learners should be able to write a formal letter using accepted conventions (addresses, date, subject line, salutation and close). This could be introduced by asking the learners to identify the correct layout using a sorting exercise. 

Learners should be able to plan and draft a letter, for example a letter of application. It may be useful to introduce planning as a group activity, asking learners to identify and highlight the key words in the question and to share ideas about how to tackle it. Learners should be encouraged to expand on any bullet points in the question.

Recapping on previous sessions, learners should use paragraphs to structure their ideas and should use complex sentences. 

Learners should be able to proofread their work for errors and make corrections. This could be introduced as a peer marking activity, where learners work in pairs to identify and make corrections. 

 

Writing: Emails  

L2.23 W Communicate information, ideas and opinions clearly, coherently and effectively

L2.24 W Write text of an appropriate level of detail and of appropriate length (including where this is specified) to meet the needs of purpose and audience

L2.25 W Organise writing for different purposes using appropriate format and structure (e.g. standard templates, paragraphs, bullet points, tables)

L2.22 SPG Spell words used in work, study and daily life, including a range of specialist words

L2.21 SPG Use correct grammar (e.g. subject–verb agreement, consistent use of a range of tenses, definite and indefinite articles) and modality devices (e.g. to express probability or desirability)

L2.20 SPG Punctuate writing correctly using a wide range of punctuation markers (e.g. colons, commas, inverted commas, apostrophes and quotation marks)

L2.28 W Construct complex sentences consistently and accurately, using paragraphs where appropriate  

 

 By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify the correct layout for an email

•             plan and draft an email

•             use complex sentences

•             proofread their work for errors. 

Learners should be able to write an email using accepted conventions. For example, choosing the correct salutation for the intended audience and the correct close. Learners could be given a selection of emails to read and asked to consider whether the tone and language used in the emails is appropriate for the audience. 

 

Learners should be able to plan and draft an email, for example an informal email to a friend, or a formal email to a work colleague. They should be encouraged to build on the planning techniques covered in the previous sessions to identify the key points in the question and plan their ideas. Learners should be reminded to expand on any bullet points in the question.

Learners should be given tasks that encourage them to develop their persuasive writing skills.

Recapping on previous sessions, learners should use paragraphs to structure their ideas and use complex sentences. 

Learners should proofread their work for errors and make corrections. This could be a peer marking activity, where learners work in pairs to identify and make corrections. 

Writing: Reviews 

L2.23 W Communicate information, ideas and opinions clearly, coherently and effectively

L2.24 W Write text of an appropriate level of detail and of appropriate length (including where this is specified) to meet the needs of purpose and audience

L2.25 W Organise writing for different purposes using appropriate format and structure (e.g. standard templates, paragraphs, bullet points, tables)

L2.22 SPG Spell words used in work, study and daily life, including a range of specialist words

L2.21 SPG Use correct grammar (e.g. subject–verb agreement, consistent use of a range of tenses, definite and indefinite articles) and modality devices (e.g. to express probability or desirability)

L2.20 SPG Punctuate writing correctly using a wide range of punctuation markers (e.g. colons, commas, inverted commas, apostrophes and quotation marks)

L2.28 W Construct complex sentences consistently and accurately, using paragraphs where appropriate 

By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify the correct layout and tone for a review

•             plan and draft a review

•             use complex sentences

•             proofread their work for errors.

Learners should be able to write a review. For example, by giving a detailed account of a film they have seen. Learners could be encouraged to reflect on the work they covered for Reading and consider what language features might help them to express their ideas. For example, using adjectives could help them to convey whether they enjoyed the film, or using questions could help to engage the audience. 

Learners should be able to plan and draft a review. They should be encouraged to build on the planning techniques covered in the previous sessions to identify the key points in the question and plan their ideas. Learners should be reminded to expand on any bullet points in the question.

Recapping on previous sessions, learners should use paragraphs to structure their ideas and should use complex sentences. 

Learners should be able to proofread their work for errors and make corrections. This could be a peer marking activity, where learners work in pairs to identify and make corrections. 

 

Writing: Articles 

 L2.23 W Communicate information, ideas and opinions clearly, coherently and effectively

L2.24 W Write text of an appropriate level of detail and of appropriate length (including where this is specified) to meet the needs of purpose and audience

L2.25 W Organise writing for different purposes using appropriate format and structure (e.g. standard templates, paragraphs, bullet points, tables)

L2.22 SPG Spell words used in work, study and daily life, including a range of specialist words

L2.21 SPG Use correct grammar (e.g. subject–verb agreement, consistent use of a range of tenses, definite and indefinite articles) and modality devices (e.g. to express probability or desirability)

L2.20 SPG Punctuate writing correctly using a wide range of punctuation markers (e.g. colons, commas, inverted commas, apostrophes and quotation marks)

L2.28 W Construct complex sentences consistently and accurately, using paragraphs where appropriate 

By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify the correct layout for an article

•             plan and draft an article

•             use complex sentences

•             proofread their work for errors.

Learners should be able to write an article. For example, for a newsletter, newspaper or magazine. They could be asked to give their opinion about a proposed change to their place of study. Learners could be encouraged to reflect on the work they covered for Reading and consider what language features might help them to express their ideas. For example, using questions or direct address may help to engage the reader. 

Learners should be able to plan and draft their article. They should be encouraged to build on the planning techniques covered in the previous sessions to identify the key points in the question and plan their ideas. Learners should be reminded to expand on any bullet points in the question and to use persuasive language techniques if appropriate. They should be able to use the correct format for the article. For example, a headline/heading and by-line.

Recapping on previous sessions, learners should use paragraphs to structure their ideas and should use complex sentences. 

Learners should be able to proofread their work for errors and make corrections. This could be a peer marking activity, where learners work in pairs to identify and make corrections. 

Writing: Mock paper practice (1)   

All Level 2 Writing specification references

L2.4 SLC Make requests and ask detailed and pertinent questions to obtain specific information in a range of contexts 

By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify key words in the question

•             plan and draft a response

•             proofread their work for errors.

 Learners should be given the opportunity to complete a mock practice paper in exam conditions (including having access to any approved exam arrangements, such as extra time).

Learners could be introduced to the format of the exam by discussing the questions as a group. Ask them to highlight the key words in each question to aid understanding. There could be a question and answer session on format, audience, purpose and tone.

Learners should plan and draft their responses independently. They should be encouraged to use all of the time available and should check their work carefully for errors. 

Writing: Reports 

 L2.23 W Communicate information, ideas and opinions clearly, coherently and effectively

L2.24 W Write text of an appropriate level of detail and of appropriate length (including where this is specified) to meet the needs of purpose and audience

L2.25 W Organise writing for different purposes using appropriate format and structure (e.g. standard templates, paragraphs, bullet points, tables)

L2.22 SPG Spell words used in work, study and daily life, including a range of specialist words

L2.21 SPG Use correct grammar (e.g. subject–verb agreement, consistent use of a range of tenses, definite and indefinite articles) and modality devices (e.g. to express probability or desirability)

L2.20 SPG Punctuate writing correctly using a wide range of punctuation markers (e.g. colons, commas, inverted commas, apostrophes and quotation marks)

L2.28 W Construct complex sentences consistently and accurately, using paragraphs where appropriate  

 By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify the correct layout for a report

•             plan and draft a formal report

•             use complex sentences

•             proofread their work for errors. 

Learners should be able to write a report. For example, they could be asked to write a report on the advantages and disadvantages of volunteering abroad. Learners could be encouraged to reflect on the work they covered for Reading and consider what language features might help them to express their ideas. For example, using statistics.   

 

Learners should be able to plan and draft their report. They should be encouraged to identify the key points in the question and plan their ideas. Learners should be reminded to expand on any bullet points in the question. They should be able to use the correct layout for report, for example headings and subheadings.

 

Recapping on previous sessions, learners should use paragraphs to structure their ideas and should use complex sentences. 

 

Learners should be able to proofread their work for errors and make corrections. This could be a peer marking activity, where learners work in pairs to identify and make corrections. 

Writing: Forum contributions  

 L2.23 W Communicate information, ideas and opinions clearly, coherently and effectively

L2.24 W Write text of an appropriate level of detail and of appropriate length (including where this is specified) to meet the needs of purpose and audience

L2.25 W Organise writing for different purposes using appropriate format and structure (e.g. standard templates, paragraphs, bullet points, tables)

L2.22 SPG Spell words used in work, study and daily life, including a range of specialist words

L2.21 SPG Use correct grammar (e.g. subject–verb agreement, consistent use of a range of tenses, definite and indefinite articles) and modality devices (e.g. to express probability or desirability)

L2.20 SPG Punctuate writing correctly using a wide range of punctuation markers (e.g. colons, commas, inverted commas, apostrophes and quotation marks)

L2.28 W Construct complex sentences consistently and accurately, using paragraphs where appropriate  

 By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify and use the correct layout for a forum contribution

•             plan and draft a forum contribution

•             use complex sentences

•             proofread their work for errors. 

Learners should be able to write a forum contribution. For example, a contribution on a topic which interests them and about which they have an opinion, such as whether National Service would reduce anti-social behaviour. Learners could be encouraged to reflect on the work they covered for Reading and consider what language features might help them to express their ideas. For example, first person or direct address. 

Learners should be able to plan and draft their forum contribution. They should be encouraged to build on the planning techniques covered in the previous sessions to identify the key points in the question and plan their ideas. Learners should be reminded to expand on any bullet points in the question. They should be able to use the correct layout for a forum, for example using their name at the start.

Recapping on previous sessions, learners should use paragraphs to structure their ideas and should use complex sentences. 

Learners should be able to proofread their work for errors and make corrections. This could be a peer marking activity, where learners work in pairs to identify and make corrections. 

Writing: Mock paper practice (2) 

All Level 2 Writing specification references

L2.4 SLC Make requests and ask detailed and pertinent questions to obtain specific information in a range of contexts   By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify key words in the question

•             plan and draft a response

•             proofread their work for errors.

 

Learners could be given a second opportunity to complete a mock practice paper in exam conditions (including having access to any approved exam arrangements, such as extra time).

It may be useful to recap any areas of difficulty identified in the first mock paper results. A question and answer session could take place to ensure the learners understand the demands of the exam and to give them the opportunity to discuss any features of the exam they are unsure of. 

Learners should plan and draft their responses independently. They should be encouraged to use all of the time available and should check their work carefully. This could be an opportunity to enter the learners for the Writing exam.*

*Assessment of this qualification can take place at the centre’s discretion. Any opportunities to formally assess learners that are given in this Scheme of Work are only suggestions.

Course review 

  L2.6 SLC Express opinions and arguments and support them with relevant and persuasive evidence

L2.7 SLC Use language that is effective, accurate and appropriate to context and situation

L2.8 SLC Make relevant and constructive contributions to move discussion forward  

By the end of the session, learners should be able to:

•             identify what went well

•             say what they would have done differently

•             say how they feel

•             identify a goal for next year.

                Learners could review their learning and say how they feel about their progress this year. They could write some short-term goals for the future.  

This session could also be used as a revision session, recapping on the key ideas covered during the year, or as an opportunity to discuss progression steps.  

Reform Functional Skills- English Level 2

Reform Functional Skills- English Level 2